Ajuga reptans

Common Names: Blue bugle, bugleherb, bugleweed, carpetweed, carpet bugleweed, common bugle, St. Lawrence plant
Category: Plants
Sub-category: Mint family

A sprawling perennial herb with erect flowering stems and grows to a height of about 10 to 35 cm. The stems are squarish with hairs on two sides and the plant has runners that spread across the surface of the ground. The purplish-green, stalked leaves are in opposite pairs. The leaf blades are hairless and are elliptical or ovate with a rounded tip and shallowly rounded teeth on the margin. The inflorescence forms a dense raceme and is composed of whorls of blue flowers, each with dark veins on the lower lip. The calyx has five toothed lobes and the corolla forms a two-lipped flower about 14 to 17 mm long with a short tube. The upper lip of each flower is short and flat with a smooth edge and the lower lip is three-lobed, the central lobe being the largest, flat with a notched tip. There are four stamens, two long and two short, which are longer than the corolla and are attached to the tube. The ovary is superior and the fruit is a schizocarp with four chambers.

In Connecticut it is most commonly found in flower gardens.

Edible Notes: The young shoots are reported to be edible and can be eaten in salads or sautéed. Young leaves are also edible; use in salads, teas, casseroles, etc.
Warnings: Not known to be dangerous.
Sightings