Mimus polyglottos

Common Names: Northern mockingbird
Category: Birds
Sub-category: Mockingbirds & Thrashers

The only mockingbird commonly found in North America. Although many species of bird imitate other birds, the northern mockingbird is the best known in North America for doing so. It imitates not only birds but also other animals and mechanical sounds such as car alarms. As convincing as these imitations may be to humans, they often fail to fool other birds.

The northern mockingbird is a medium-sized bird that has long legs and tail. Males and females look alike. Its upper parts are colored gray, while its underparts have a white or whitish-gray color. It has parallel wing bars on the half of the wings connected near the white patch giving it a distinctive appearance in flight. The black central rectrices and typical white lateral rectrices are also noticeable in flight. The iris is usually a light green-yellow or a yellow, but there have been instances of an orange color. The bill is black with a brownish black appearance at the base. The juvenile appearance is marked by its streaks on its back, distinguished spots and streaks on its chest, and a gray or grayish-green iris.

The mockingbird's habitat varies by location, but it prefers open areas with sparse vegetation. In the eastern regions, suburban and urban areas such as parks, gardens are frequent residential areas. It has an affinity for mowed lawns with shrubs within proximity for shade and nesting.

Edible Notes: No available information on edibility.
Warnings: Not known to be dangerous.
Sightings