Anas carolinensis

Common Names: Green-winged Teal
Category: Birds
Sub-category: Ducks, Geese, & Swans

The smallest North American dabbling duck. The breeding male has grey flanks and back, with a yellow rear end and a white-edged green speculum, obvious in flight or at rest. It has a chestnut head with a green eye patch. The females are light brown, with plumage much like a female Mallard. They can be distinguished from most ducks on size and shape, and the speculum. In non-breeding (eclipse) plumage, the drake looks more like the female.

It is a common duck of sheltered wetlands, such as taiga bogs, and usually feeds by dabbling for plant food or grazing. It nests on the ground, near water and under cover. Green-winged Teal inhabit inland lakes, marshes, ponds, pools, and shallow streams with dense emergent and aquatic vegetation. They prefer shallow waters and small ponds and pools during the breeding season. Green-winged Teal are often found resting on mudbanks or stumps, or perching on low limbs of dead trees. These ducks nest in depressions on dry ground located at the base of shrubs, under a log, or in dense grass. Green-winged teal avoid treeless or brushless habitats. Green-winged teal winter in both freshwater or brackish marshes, ponds, streams, and estuaries. As they are smaller birds, they tend to stay in the calmer water.

Edible Notes: Duck meat is edible. Farm-raised domestic duck is commonly available in supermarkets in Connecticut and is a good alternative. Duck meat (domestic) is a common dish in Asian restaurants, especially Thai cuisine.
Warnings: Not known to be dangerous.
Sightings